NIGHT SPEAKERS

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Snoring, which is also referred to as NIGHT SPEAKERS, is noisy breathing during sleep. It is a common problem among all ages and both genders, and it affects a lot of people especially fat people on a regular basis. Snoring may occur nightly or intermittently. Persons most at risk are males and those who are overweight, but snoring is a problem of both genders, although it is possible that women do not present with this complaint as frequently as men. Snoring usually becomes more serious as people age. It can cause disruptions to your own sleep and your bed-partner’s sleep. It can lead to fragmented and un-refreshing sleep which translates into poor daytime function (tiredness and sleepiness). The two most common adverse health effects that are believed to be casually linked to snoring are daytime dysfunction and heart disease. About one-half of people who snore loudly have obstructive sleep apnea.

While you sleep, the muscles of your throat relax, your tongue falls backward, and your throat becomes narrow and “floppy.” As you breathe, the walls of the throat begin to vibrate – generally when you breathe in, but also, to a lesser extent, when you breathe out. These vibrations lead to the characteristic sound of snoring. The narrower your airway becomes, the greater the vibration and the louder your snoring. Sometimes the walls of the throat collapse completely so that it is completely occluded, creating a condition called apnea (cessation of breathing). This is a serious condition which requires medical attention.

There are several factors which facilitate snoring. First, the normal aging process leads to the relaxation of the throat muscles, thus resulting in snoring. Anatomical abnormalities of the nose and throat, such as enlarged tonsils or adenoids, nasal polyps, or deviated nasal septum cause exaggerated narrowing of the throat during sleep and thus lead to snoring. Functional abnormalities (e.g. inflammation of the nose and/or throat as may occur during respiratory infection or during allergy season) will result in snoring. Sleep position, such as sleeping on your back, may lead to snoring in some people. Alcohol is a potent muscle relaxant and relaxes the muscles.

People who snore make a vibrating, rattling, noisy sound while breathing during sleep. It may be a symptom of sleep apnea. Consult your doctor if you snore and have any of the following symptoms or signs:

Excessive daytime sleepiness
Morning headaches
Recent weight gain
Awakening in the morning not feeling rested
Awaking at night feeling confused
Change in your level of attention, concentration, or memory observed pauses in breathing during sleep.

People who suffer mild or occasional snoring, who wake up feeling refreshed, and function well during the day may first try the following behavioral remedies, before consulting their doctor:
In order to cope with the situation, you must try and observe the following recommendations.
Lose weight
Avoid tranquilizers, sleeping pills, and antihistamines before bedtime
Avoid alcohol for at least four hours and heavy meals or snacks for three hours before retiring
Establish regular sleeping patterns
Sleep on your side rather than your back.

KOJO OFORI.

Source:  NATIONAL SLEEPING FOUNDATION and reviewed by Victor Hoffstein, M.D.

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